Archive for November, 2006|Monthly archive page

Surfing on the Clock May Come Back to Haunt You

by Laura Merrill, Manager of Cooperative Education

While some companies are starting to ban employee internet access to prevent non-work-related surfing, others are actually building portals through which their employees can access the web. So what should you do? The key to safe surfing is to know your company’s internet-usage policy and to stick by it. In a corporate environment, the guidelines may be stringent; in a casual environment, maybe not.

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Top Ten Rules for Effective Netiquette

by Laura Merrill, Manager of Cooperative Education

Emailing friends and strangers can be a fast and loose way to keep in touch, but when you use email on the job—or to find a job– you need to follow the rules of the road. Email etiquette, otherwise known as “netiquette,” adds professionalism and impact to your messaging, without sacrificing speed and efficiency. Here are 10 guidelines to remember when keystroking for your employer.

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Electronic Marketing: Using E-Resumes and E-Cover Letters

By Eileen Davis, Director of Career Counseling

Just as you can’t conduct a thorough job search without using electronic tools such as e-mail, job boards, and company web sites, you won’t be fully prepared for the search without text versions of your resume and cover letter. You’ll still need a nicely formatted “print” version of your resume for career fairs, interviews, and other face-to-face meetings. But the formatting that makes printed resumes eye-appealing can be an obstacle to the 80% of employers who place resumes into searchable databases. In addition, some employers won’t open e-mail attachments because of concerns about computer viruses. To make sure your documents can be “read” electronically in databases, job-boards, and e-mail, create text (or ASCII) versions of both your resume and cover letter.  

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Bloggers Need Not Apply

by Charity Mouck, Assistant Director of Career Services & Employer Relations, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

I stole the title for this article from one I read in the July 8, 2005, issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Their article by the same name ran in that issue and I remember reading it with great interest because I myself am an avid blogger and web designer. The basic pretense of that article and many that have followed since then, was that students, faculty and staff, which we can collectively label “job seekers”, may in fact be hampered in their efforts to find employment because of a little side hobby they have called blogging.

For those of you not familiar with the term, blogging is what one does with their blog, which is short for the word weblog. A weblog is a website that presents and archives information in a chronological format. Basically it is a venue for writing, ranting and the disclosure of whatever information the blogger sees fit, which can include pictures as well as the written word.

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